May 302016

posterI doubt there is a thirty-something year old in the world who didn’t have this poster on the wall of their university dorm room.

Well, except people who didn’t go to university of course.

And people who grew up in Asia or Africa. Or South America. Or one of the Russian states come to think about it. And if you weren’t into films you probably didn’t have it either.

So – I doubt there is a thirty-something who went to university in a westernised country and was a bit of a movie geek in the world who didn’t have this poster on their dorm room wall.

Although come to think about it, I didn’t see it on many girls’ dorm rooms either. But then again I never really got to see the insides of all that many girls dorm rooms anyway (at least not without climbing up ladders and peeking through windows), so I could be wrong on that one.

Anyway, you get my point. Among a certain demographic this was a extremely popular movie poster.
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Apr 242016

I don’t think it’s any great secret that one of my favourite films of all time is the John Carpenter masterpiece Big Trouble in Little China. Now the thing a lot of people don’t realise when it comes to John Carpenter films is that the dude likes to write the music for his films and will perform it. Classic soundtracks such as Halloween and Escape from New York capture the feel of the films perfectly in no small part thanks to John Carpenter envisaging everything he wants from his film.

So like his other films John Carpenter was very hands on for the soundtrack of Big Trouble in Little China and it only adds to the Carpenter feel of the film. I’m not 100% certain but I can’t recall any other films he performed lyrics for the music like he did here:


Yes that’s right, the main singer there is none other than John Carpenter himself!

The CDs are pretty scarce on the ground unfortunately, my impression is that I have an actual copy in my collection somewhere but it’s equally likely that I’m confusing the Escape from New York soundtrack and that the copy I have is borrowed from my cousin Larry. iTunes doesn’t carry the music either except for a couple of tracks on compilations.

Here’s the track listing for those of you keeping score at home, this is of the original soundtrack, not the re-release:
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  •  April 24, 2016
  •  Posted by Aaron Collier
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Apr 122016

batmanWhilst we are having a little bit of a Michael Keaton’fest this month that’s not why I’ve included the Batman Returns poster in Movie Poster Monday. I was actually reminded of it a couple of weeks back as I wrote about the Gremlins poster and realised that the “trio” poster for Batman Returns was by the same artist John Alvin.

What I find interesting about the Batman Returns poster personally is that when it was released I don’t believe I cared for it. I think it was the third poster to be released for the movie and the main poster was a homage to the original Batman poster featuring just the bat symbol, only this time it was in snow to match the tone of the film. When this poster was released I didn’t really understand why they would bother. It certainly wasn’t very epic.

I’ve since warmed to the poster, over the years I’ve actually come to really like it if only that it stands out in my mind. The poster actually is made up of three posters, kind of, the Catwoman and Penguin poses are off the character posters and whilst there is a Batman standalone character sheet he’s at more of an angle so they must have felt the composite needed him to be face on.
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  •  April 12, 2016
  •  Posted by Aaron Collier
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Apr 042016

storyThe Philadelphia Story is a romantic comedy with an enduring presence in America’s film history. According to the American Film Institute its number five as one of the most enigmatic and truly profound romantic comedies. To add to it commendation it gave one of Hollywood’s greatest stars, Katherine Hepburn her first big break and eventual first academy award, the first of many. And most critics of films of the Hollywood’s golden age consider it a perfect example of comedy of remarriage.

The 1940 movie was an actual adaption of a 1939 Broadway play of the same title. A story of love between a socialite ex-wife and three men, her ex-husband and to add to the cauldron of drama and chaos the insertion of tabloid magazine journalist on her heels and a her to be husband, business man.. The 112 minutes film was actually inspired by the life and times of Philadelphia Socialite Helen Hope Montgomery the wife of friend of the play writer Philip Barry.

Philadelphia socialites Tracy Lord marries and divorces the very wealthy high standing C.K.K Dexter Haven. Due to his excessive inebriation and her unforgiving nature of the treatment of this both split and go their separate ways. The films starts off at the point when Tracy is about to remarry rich, business man George Kittredge, a worthy fiancé according to all standards. Spy magazine publisher is eager to cover the wedding of the year and finds himself taking on Dexter to help him to get in Liz, a photographer and Mike, a reporter for Spy under the cover that they were Tracy’s estranged brother Junius old friends into the wedding.


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  •  April 4, 2016
  •  Posted by Aaron Collier
  •   Comments Off on The Philadelphia Story- A Tale of Love Lost and Found